Writing the Thesis Statement

Refresh your memory on thesis statements:

“A thesis statement:

  • tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion.
  • is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper.
  • directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself. The subject, or topic, of an essay might be World War II or Moby Dick; a thesis must then offer a way to understand the war or the novel.
  • makes a claim that others might dispute.
  • is usually a single sentence somewhere in your first paragraph that presents your argument to the reader. The rest of the paper, the body of the essay, gathers and organizes evidence that will persuade the reader of the logic of your interpretation.

If your assignment asks you to take a position or develop a claim about a subject, you may need to convey that position or claim in a thesis statement near the beginning of your draft. The assignment may not explicitly state that you need a thesis statement because your instructor may assume you will include one. When in doubt, ask your instructor if the assignment requires a thesis statement. When an assignment asks you to analyze, to interpret, to compare and contrast, to demonstrate cause and effect, or to take a stand on an issue, it is likely that you are being asked to develop a thesis and to support it persuasively.”  (University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill)

Go to the Writing Center link below for more:

http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/thesis-statements/

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https://wikis.engrade.com/lisasimpsononthesisstate

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http://s3.amazonaws.com/engrade-myfiles/4047737286585924/.Understanding_Thesis_Statements.pdf

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Today’s Assignment: Complete your thesis statement.